evennia.commands.cmdsethandler

CmdSethandler

The Cmdsethandler tracks an object’s ‘Current CmdSet’, which is the current merged sum of all CmdSets added to it.

A CmdSet constitues a set of commands. The CmdSet works as a special intelligent container that, when added to other CmdSet make sure that same-name commands are treated correctly (usually so there are no doublets). This temporary but up-to-date merger of CmdSet is jointly called the Current Cmset. It is this Current CmdSet that the commandhandler looks through whenever an account enters a command (it also adds CmdSets from objects in the room in real-time). All account objects have a ‘default cmdset’ containing all the normal in-game mud commands (look etc).

So what is all this cmdset complexity good for?

In its simplest form, a CmdSet has no commands, only a key name. In this case the cmdset’s use is up to each individual game - it can be used by an AI module for example (mobs in cmdset ‘roam’ move from room to room, in cmdset ‘attack’ they enter combat with accounts).

Defining commands in cmdsets offer some further powerful game-design consequences however. Here are some examples:

As mentioned above, all accounts always have at least the Default CmdSet. This contains the set of all normal-use commands in-game, stuff like look and @desc etc. Now assume our players end up in a dark room. You don’t want the player to be able to do much in that dark room unless they light a candle. You could handle this by changing all your normal commands to check if the player is in a dark room. This rapidly goes unwieldly and error prone. Instead you just define a cmdset with only those commands you want to be available in the ‘dark’ cmdset - maybe a modified look command and a ‘light candle’ command - and have this completely replace the default cmdset.

Another example: Say you want your players to be able to go fishing. You could implement this as a ‘fish’ command that fails whenever the account has no fishing rod. Easy enough. But what if you want to make fishing more complex - maybe you want four-five different commands for throwing your line, reeling in, etc? Most players won’t (we assume) have fishing gear, and having all those detailed commands is cluttering up the command list. And what if you want to use the ‘throw’ command also for throwing rocks etc instead of ‘using it up’ for a minor thing like fishing?

So instead you put all those detailed fishing commands into their own CommandSet called ‘Fishing’. Whenever the player gives the command ‘fish’ (presumably the code checks there is also water nearby), only THEN this CommandSet is added to the Cmdhandler of the account. The ‘throw’ command (which normally throws rocks) is replaced by the custom ‘fishing variant’ of throw. What has happened is that the Fishing CommandSet was merged on top of the Default ones, and due to how we defined it, its command overrules the default ones.

When we are tired of fishing, we give the ‘go home’ command (or whatever) and the Cmdhandler simply removes the fishing CommandSet so that we are back at defaults (and can throw rocks again).

Since any number of CommandSets can be piled on top of each other, you can then implement separate sets for different situations. For example, you can have a ‘On a boat’ set, onto which you then tack on the ‘Fishing’ set. Fishing from a boat? No problem!

evennia.commands.cmdsethandler.import_cmdset(path, cmdsetobj, emit_to_obj=None, no_logging=False)[source]

This helper function is used by the cmdsethandler to load a cmdset instance from a python module, given a python_path. It’s usually accessed through the cmdsethandler’s add() and add_default() methods. path - This is the full path to the cmdset object on python dot-form

Parameters
  • path (str) – The path to the command set to load.

  • cmdsetobj (CmdSet) – The database object/typeclass on which this cmdset is to be assigned (this can be also channels and exits, as well as accounts but there will always be such an object)

  • emit_to_obj (Object, optional) – If given, error is emitted to this object (in addition to logging)

  • no_logging (bool, optional) – Don’t log/send error messages. This can be useful if import_cmdset is just used to check if this is a valid python path or not.

Returns

cmdset (CmdSet)

The imported command set. If an error was

encountered, commands.cmdsethandler._ErrorCmdSet is returned for the benefit of the handler.

class evennia.commands.cmdsethandler.CmdSetHandler(obj, init_true=True)[source]

Bases: object

The CmdSetHandler is always stored on an object, this object is supplied as an argument.

The ‘current’ cmdset is the merged set currently active for this object. This is the set the game engine will retrieve when determining which commands are available to the object. The cmdset_stack holds a history of all CmdSets to allow the handler to remove/add cmdsets at will. Doing so will re-calculate the ‘current’ cmdset.

__init__(obj, init_true=True)[source]

This method is called whenever an object is recreated.

Parameters
  • obj (Object) – An reference to the game object this handler belongs to.

  • init_true (bool, optional) – Set when the handler is initializing and loads the current cmdset.

update(init_mode=False)[source]

Re-adds all sets in the handler to have an updated current

Parameters

init_mode (bool, optional) – Used automatically right after this handler was created; it imports all permanent cmdsets from the database.

Notes

This method is necessary in order to always have a .current cmdset when working with the cmdsethandler in code. But the CmdSetHandler doesn’t (cannot) consider external cmdsets and game state. This means that the .current calculated from this method will likely not match the true current cmdset as determined at run-time by cmdhandler.get_and_merge_cmdsets(). So in a running game the responsibility of keeping .current upt-to-date belongs to the central cmdhandler.get_and_merge_cmdsets()!

add(cmdset, emit_to_obj=None, persistent=True, permanent=True, default_cmdset=False, **kwargs)[source]

Add a cmdset to the handler, on top of the old ones, unless it is set as the default one (it will then end up at the bottom of the stack)

Parameters
  • cmdset (CmdSet or str) – Can be a cmdset object or the python path to such an object.

  • emit_to_obj (Object, optional) – An object to receive error messages.

  • persistent (bool, optional) – Let cmdset remain across server reload.

  • permanent (bool, optional) – DEPRECATED. This has the same use as persistent.

  • default_cmdset (Cmdset, optional) – Insert this to replace the default cmdset position (there is only one such position, always at the bottom of the stack).

Notes

An interesting feature of this method is if you were to send it an already instantiated cmdset (i.e. not a class), the current cmdsethandler’s obj attribute will then not be transferred over to this already instantiated set (this is because it might be used elsewhere and can cause strange effects). This means you could in principle have the handler launch command sets tied to a different object than the handler. Not sure when this would be useful, but it’s a ‘quirk’ that has to be documented.

add_default(cmdset, emit_to_obj=None, permanent=True)[source]

Shortcut for adding a default cmdset.

Parameters
  • cmdset (Cmdset) – The Cmdset to add.

  • emit_to_obj (Object, optional) – Gets error messages

  • permanent (bool, optional) – The new Cmdset should survive a server reboot.

remove(cmdset=None, default_cmdset=False)[source]

Remove a cmdset from the handler.

Parameters
  • cmdset (CommandSet or str, optional) – This can can be supplied either as a cmdset-key, an instance of the CmdSet or a python path to the cmdset. If no key is given, the last cmdset in the stack is removed. Whenever the cmdset_stack changes, the cmdset is updated. If default_cmdset is set, this argument is ignored.

  • default_cmdset (bool, optional) – If set, this will remove the default cmdset (at the bottom of the stack).

delete(cmdset=None, default_cmdset=False)

Remove a cmdset from the handler.

Parameters
  • cmdset (CommandSet or str, optional) – This can can be supplied either as a cmdset-key, an instance of the CmdSet or a python path to the cmdset. If no key is given, the last cmdset in the stack is removed. Whenever the cmdset_stack changes, the cmdset is updated. If default_cmdset is set, this argument is ignored.

  • default_cmdset (bool, optional) – If set, this will remove the default cmdset (at the bottom of the stack).

remove_default()[source]

This explicitly deletes only the default cmdset.

delete_default()

This explicitly deletes only the default cmdset.

get()[source]

Get all cmdsets.

Returns

cmdsets (list) – All the command sets currently in the handler.

all()

Get all cmdsets.

Returns

cmdsets (list) – All the command sets currently in the handler.

clear()[source]

Removes all Command Sets from the handler except the default one (use self.remove_default to remove that).

has(cmdset, must_be_default=False)[source]

checks so the cmdsethandler contains a given cmdset

Parameters
  • cmdset (str or Cmdset) – Cmdset key, pythonpath or Cmdset to check the existence for.

  • must_be_default (bool, optional) – Only return True if the checked cmdset is the default one.

Returns

has_cmdset (bool) – Whether or not the cmdset is in the handler.

has_cmdset(cmdset, must_be_default=False)

checks so the cmdsethandler contains a given cmdset

Parameters
  • cmdset (str or Cmdset) – Cmdset key, pythonpath or Cmdset to check the existence for.

  • must_be_default (bool, optional) – Only return True if the checked cmdset is the default one.

Returns

has_cmdset (bool) – Whether or not the cmdset is in the handler.

reset()[source]

Force reload of all cmdsets in handler. This should be called after _CACHED_CMDSETS have been cleared (normally this is handled automatically by @reload).